Alyssa Frampton

Country representing

Canada

Languages

English

Education

  • Saint Mary's University
  • B.A. Political Science
  • Humber College, Public Relations

Current organisation

Multiple. Previously attended OYW with AstraZeneca's Young Health Programme.

Current role

Adolecent Health, Policy, and Engagement

Skills and Expertise

Activism
Campaigning
Healthcare
Human rights
Politics

Areas of interest

Education
Health
Human Rights
Leadership
Sustainable Development

Website & Social Links

I am passionate about

At the core of all my work and activism is the belief that health is a human right. I believe that all persons deserve equal access to quality health care. I have focused in on working for all young people to have equal and quality access to health. Adolescents currently make up over 25% of the global population and there is an exciting opportunity to have them be empowered and engaged in their health. I am very passionate about giving the power back to young people by educating them on their rights and abilities in order to be active participants of their wellbeing, and anything that else will affect through advocacy and engaging them in health policy. I work to help educate young people on their health rights, the power of advocacy, and how they can move from idea to action. I spent a lot of my life living in a rural community in Canada where many of my health rights such as privacy were not met. Many of my friends faced medical needs that also went un-met because of the lack of quality care that was provided to them, in both areas of physical and mental health. Once I started to work with young people across Canada I was quick to realize that this is the case for many young people. Over the past three years I've lead www.YouthHealthRights.ca researching youth health rights, while educating others, and advocating for better access to quality health care for young people everywhere. I believe that the best way to move anything forward is with the people are affected the most - my work is guided by the saying nothing for us, without us, which I think is most important when it comes to adolescents globally right now in any context. We are the largest population, and yet so many of our needs are unmet. If we don't fight for better services and inclusion today, we are likely to be further behind tomorrow and it isn't an option! My passion is in knowing that we deserve better, and we can achieve it when adolescents are listened to and included in the change.

Actions

I have helped create a positive change in both my organization and my country by advocating on behalf of young people for inclusion. In my time as a Chair of the Young Canadians Roundtable on Health I fought to give young people a platform to become advocates in their own community, to be leaders for change, to be active participants in their wellness, and now I am leading a project where we have created a platform to mobilize more young people to lobby government for better access to their rights and a voice at the table when it comes to health policy. I work on various other projects that all revolve around working with young people and advocacy to government for health changes and better more youth inclusive policy. I think the biggest change I have driven is leading in the project to research health rights of young people in Canada, and creating a platform that is both informative while giving a space for other young people to get involved in moving their health rights and service access forward. The platform is advocating for the Canadian government to contribute in more ways to move the health agenda for young people forward, and to fix the gaps when it comes to young people being able to use their rights and rake action for their health. As of 2017, the youthhealthrights.ca project has reached over 1000 Canadian youth and we have began working with a number of provincial health ministers on how to integrate youth voice in health policy. I have been also supporting advocacy with young people around Bill S228 to stop marketing to kids in Canada, and with the help of many other relentless advocates the bill is now moving through the House and there is an excellent chance we will see new regulations, which will be a win for child health and non-communicable disease prevention.